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Anti-Bullying Week

This week is Anti-Bullying Week when all schools across the country focus on this important topic. The theme this year is "All Different, All Equal" and this will be the focus of assemblies for year groups throughout the week.

Within tutor groups, students will be making posters of what makes them different and unique. In addition we will be asking students to think about what the things they sometimes say as "banter" can be hurtful.

Below is some advice for parents if you are concerned that your child is being bullied. Please do not hesitate to contact your child's tutor if you do have any concerns as the school is very keen to work closely with parents to make sure we eliminate any bullying that students experience.

 

Information to Parents/Carers


What to do if your child is being bullied? If your child tells you they are being bullied here is what you can do to help.

  • Praise them for telling you and reassure them they have done the right thing.
  • Try to find out the facts – what exactly has happened?
  • Is it Bullying? Use the checklist below to help.

 

Bullying goes on for a while, or happens regularly.

Bullying is deliberate. The other person wants to hurt, humiliate or harm the target.

Bullying involves someone (or several people) who are stronger in some way than the person being bullied. The person who is doing the bullying may have more power; they are older, stronger, there are more of them or they have some “hold” over the target.


Bullying is not:

  • A one off fight or argument
  • A friend sometimes being nasty
  • An argument with a friend


Use your best listening skills. Accept your child’s feelings; encourage them to talk about their worries by listening. Don’t belittle what they are going through even if it seems very minor to you.
Help them to think about what they would like to happen and ask how you can help. Please involve their Tutor, Year Leader or Student Support Advisor, if your child feels they need support in school to stop it happening. Agree how this could be done.